Craps

DICE CONTROL for Casino Craps

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How To Play Craps

The casino game of Craps is played with a set of two perfectly balanced dice with each die having six white dots numbered 1 through 6. The game is played by tossing the dice from one of the short ends of the table to the other (make sure that both die hit the opposite side wall of the table). Payoffs are made based on the number combination displayed when the dice come to rest.

The inside walls of the table are covered with a serrated egg-carton like foam, designed to make the dice bounce around to assure randomness. Each throw of the dice is called a “roll”. Players take turn rolling the dice, clockwise around the table, and the player rolling at any given time is called the “shooter”. When a new shooter is given the dice, his or her first roll is called the “”Come Out”” roll. This begins a new series of rolls by that shooter and lasts for as long as that shooter continues to make winning rolls.

A new game in Craps begins with the “”Come Out”” roll. A “”Come Out”” roll can be made only when the previous shooter fails to make a winning roll — more correctly known as “not making the “Point”” or “seven out”. A new game then begins with a new shooter. If the current shooter does make his “Point”, the dice are returned to him and he then begins the new “Come Out” roll. This is a continuation of that shooter’s roll, although technically, the “Come Out” roll identifies a new game about to begin.

When the shooter fails to make his or her “Point”, the dice are then offered to the next player for a new “Come Out” roll and the game continues in the same manner. The new shooter will be the person directly next to the left of the previous shooter.

On the “Come Out” roll, the “Pass Line” bet wins if the shooter rolls a 7 or an 11. The bet loses automatically if the shooter rolls 2, 3 or 12. This is known as “rolling craps”. If the shooter rolls 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 or 10 the shooter must roll this same number again (to win) before rolling the number 7. Rolling any of these numbers on the “Come Out” roll is called “establishing the “Point”. Any number so rolled is thereafter referred to as the “Point”.

Establishing a “Point” is an event that happens as the immediate result of the “Come Out” roll, unless that “Come Out” roll results in 7, 11, 2, 3 or 12, in which case more rolls must be made until a “Point” is established.

It now becomes important to mention a device that looks like a hockey puck called the “Puck”. It is white on one side and black on the other, and is used by the dealers to identify the “Point”. Once the shooter establishes the “Point”, the dealer will move this puck to that “Point” number and turn it the white side up. The puck stays on this “Point” until the shooter either makes his “Point” or until he sevens out. When the puck is moved to the “Don’t Come” bar 12 area and turned black side up. The significance of this device is only in tracking the game. White side up over a “Point” indicates the game is in progress and that this box number is the “Point”. Black side up means a new “Come Out” roll is about to take place.

As with all table games, you will begin by changing your cash money into gaming chips. In Craps you do this by throwing your money on the table and yelling, “change”. If the table is playing well there will be a lot of people crowding around and a lot of noise, so make sure you yell out. Also it is a good idea to wait and ask for change between rolls of the dice.

In Craps, winning or losing depends on a variety of different possible outcomes on any roll of the two dice. The two dice can produce many different number combinations; some can be made several ways, others only one way. For example, two dice can roll the number 6 as follows: 5/1, 4/2, 3/3, 2/4 and 1/5. But the number 2 can only be rolled one way: 1/1. Numbers such as 6, which can be rolled several ways, don’t pay as much as numbers which can be rolled only one way, unless you are betting that the number will be rolled in a specific way, such has 3/3, known as “Hardways”. All winning payoffs are, therefore, determined by the frequency in which any two-dice number combinations can be rolled. Generally, the harder the combination is to roll, the more it will pay, and vice versa.

Although really taking advantage of the many betting options can involve a considerable degree of mastery, in its simplest form, Craps is a game where players bet either that the shooter will make his “Point” or that he or she will not make their “Point”. Betting that the shooter will make his/her “Point” is called betting “with the shooter” (also called “betting right”) and betting that the shooter will not make his/her “Point” is called “betting against the shooter” (also called “betting wrong”).

To bet with the shooter, you must place your bet in an area marked “”Pass Line””, before the new shooter rolls the dice. The so-called “Pass Line” is a strip on the table layout marked by two lines roughly two inches wide and it rims the entire table layout across from the Box Man. To bet against the shooter, you must place your bet in an area marked “Don’t Pass”. This area is also a strip on the table layout and it rims the table directly above the “Pass Line”.

No matter what stage the game is in, whether on the “Come Out” roll, or in progress, you can jump in immediately and place any bets. The only exception to this is the bet called the “Pass Line” bet with odds”, which can be made only on the “Come Out” roll. You can, however, bet with the shooter even while the game is in progress by placing a “Pass Line” bet without odds. Placing your chips halfway over one of the two lines framing the “Pass Line” area does this.

Before the new shooter rolls the dice on his or her “Come Out” roll, there are a variety of bets that can be made. The “Pass Line” and Don’t Pass Line” bet are the most common bets to make. Once the shooter establishes a “Point”, you can then place an additional bet behind your “Pass Line” bet. This is called “taking odds”.

In most casinos you can bet up to three times the amount of your “Pass Line” bet. This is called “taking full odds”. Some casinos offer up to 100 times odds! This simply means that you can bet up to 100 times the amount of your “Pass Line” bet once a “Point” has been established.

Betting the “Don’t Pass Line” is the exact opposite of betting the “Pass Line”. The “Don’t Pass” bet wins if the shooter rolls any craps; 2 or 3 (12 is considered a push; the bet neither wins nor loses, merely stays in limbo till a decision is reached on subsequent rolls) and loses if shooter rolls a 7 or 11.

Once the shooter establishes a “Point” your “Don’t Pass” bet stays in action, win until the shooter rolls a 7 or make his/her “Point”. Therefore, a “Don’t Pass” bet wins if the shooter fails to make his “Point”, but loses if the shooter does make the “Point”. You can also take odds on a “Dont Pass” bet.

CRAPS GLOSSARY

Box man:table supervisor who sits between the stickman and directly behind the thousands of dollars worth of chips that the casino keeps on hand at each craps table.

Dealer:is responsible for all the bets made on his half of the table. Whenever you want to make free odds, place, or lay bet in a casino, you should give the money to the dealer at your end of the table and he will make the bet for you.

Floor men:are the people who are responsible for the games in the casino. Floor men spent their time behind the tables watching over the games.

Marker Puck: plastic disks that the dealers use to mark the point on the Craps table. When the buck is turned so that the side inscribed with ‘off’ is face up, then all free odds bets have no action on the following roll of the dice.

Pit: is the area enclosed by all of the craps tables in a casino. Floor men walk around in the pit and keep an eye on the craps games in progress and the casino employees.

Stickman: the casino employee who calls out the dice rolls and returns the dice to the shooter. The stickman also is responsible for the placing and paying the proposition bets.

Aces: Betting that the next roll will be the total sum of 2.

Any Craps: A bet that the next roll will be 2, 3, or 12. This bet pays 7:1 and has a house edge of 11.1%.

3-Way Craps: A bet made in units of 3 with one unit on 2, one unit on 3, and one unit on 12. This is a horn bet without the bet on 11.

Any Seven: A bet that the next roll will be 7. This bet pays 4:1 and has a house edge of 16.7%.

Big 6: A bet that a 6 will be rolled before a 7 comes up. This bet pays even money, and has a house edge of 9.1%. A place bet on 6 pays 7:6 but is identical otherwise. The place bet is preferred, having a house edge of 1.5% .

Big 8: A bet that an 8 will be rolled before a 7 comes up. This bet pays even money, and has a house edge of 9.1%. A place bet on 8 pays 7:6 but is identical otherwise. The place bet is preferred, having a house edge of 1.5% .

Big Red: Placing a bet on Any Seven.

Boxcars: Betting on the 12.

Buffalo: Placing a bet on each of the Hardway and Any Seven.

Buy Bet: Giving the house a 5% commission in order to be paid correct odds for a place bet. The buy bets on 4 and 10 allow the player to reduce the house edge from 6.67% to 4% on these bets. Some casinos collect the commission only on winning bets, while others collect it at the time the bet is made.

Come Bet: A “virtual pass line bet”; a bet made after the come out roll but in other respects exactly like a pass line bet.

Come Out: Roll the first roll of the dice in a betting round is called the “come out” roll. Pass bets win when the come out roll is 7 or 11, while pass bets lose when the come out roll is 2, 3, or 12. Don’t bets lose when the come out roll is 7 or 11, and don’t bets win when the come out roll is 2 or 3. Don’t bets tie when the come out roll is 12 (2 in some casinos; the “bar” roll on the layout indicates which roll is treated as a tie).

Don’t Come: Bet A “virtual don’t pass bet”; a bet made after the come out roll.

Don’t Pass: Bet a bet that the dice will not pass. This bet can be placed only immediately before a “come out” roll. One result (either the 2 or the 12, depending on the casino) will result in a push. House edge on these bets is 1.40%. A Don’t Pass bet can be taken down, but not increased, after the come-out roll.

Double Odds: An odd bet that is about twice as large as the original pass/come bet. Some casinos offer higher odds, such as 5X or even 10X odds.

Field Bet: A bet that the next roll would be 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, or 12. This bet pays even money for 3, 4, 9, 10, and 11, and usually pays 2:1 for 2 or 12. Some casinos pay 3:1 for either the 2 or 12 (but not both), and some casinos may make the 5 instead of the 9 a field roll.

Hard Way: A bet on 4, 6, 8, or 10 that wins only if the dice show the same face; e.g., “hard 8” occurs when each die shows a four.

Hop Bet: A bet that the next roll will result in one particular combination of the dice, such as 2-2 (called a “hopping hardway”) or 3-5. 2-2, 3-3, 4-4, and 5-5 are paid the same as a one-roll 2; other hop bets are paid the same as a one-roll 11.

Horn Bet: A bet that the next roll will be 2, 3, 11, or 12, made in multiples of 4, with one unit on each of the numbers.

Horn High Bet: A bet made in multiples of 5 with one unit on 3 of the horn numbers, and two units on the “high” number (number 12). “$5 horn high eleven”: $1 each on 2, 3, 12, and $2 on the 11.

Lay Bet: A bet that a particular number (4,5,6,8,9, or 10) will NOT be rolled before a 7 comes up. The casino takes 5% of the winnings on these bets. The 5% commission is usually taken up front, but some casinos take the commission after the bet wins.

Lay Odds: After a point has been established, the don’t pass bettor can place an additional odds bet that will win if the original don’t pass bet wins. The odds bet is paid at the correct odds for the point, and is a fair bet with no house edge. This also applies to a don’t come bet. Making this bets is referred to “laying the odds” for your don’t bet.

Line Bet: A bet on the “pass line” or the “don’t pass line” is called a “line” bet. These bets are placed at the beginning of the game, before the “come out” roll. The shooter is required to make a line bet in order to shoot the dice.

Little Joe: A pair of twos or Hard 4.

Midnight: Betting on the number 12 to appear on the next roll.

Odds: Off an odd bets that are “not working”. Odds bets can be called “off” by the player at any time, but are left on the felt until the bet is resolved. Also, come odds bets are usually “off” during the come out roll, unless the bettor asks to have the odds bets “working”. Come odd bets that are “off” will be returned to the player if the line bet loses on the come out roll. Don’t come odds generally work on the come-out roll.

Pass Bet: A bet that the dice will pass, also known as a “pass line” bet. This bet is generally placed immediately before a “come out” roll, although you can make or increase this bet at any time. House edge on this bets is 1.41%.

Parley: Increasing a bet usually by double.

Place Bet: A bet that a particular number (4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10) will be rolled before a 7 comes up. These bets are paid at slightly less than correct odds, giving the house an edge of 1.52% on 6/8, 4% on 5/9, and 6.67% on 4/10.

Lay Bet: A bet that a 7 will be rolled before the number you are placing (4,5,6,8,9, or 10) comes up. The casino requires you to lay slightly more than the correct odds, giving the house an edge of 3.03% on 4/10, 2.5% on 5/9, and 1.82% on 6/8.

Point: If a 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10 is rolled on the come out roll, then this number becomes the “point”. The shooter must roll the point again, before rolling a seven, in order for the dice to “pass”. A “come point” is just the number that is serving as a point for a come bet.

Right Bettor: A player who bets that the dice will pass.

Press: Adding your winnings to your bet.

Seven Out: When the shooter rolls seven after a point has been established. Control of the dice is transferred to the next shooter. Another terms for this is “miss out.” You will sometimes hear players call this something else, but we can’t print those things here. This is often incorrectly called “craps out.”

Shooter: The player who is rolling the dice. The shooter must place a “line” bet (“pass” or “don’t pass”) in order to be eligible to roll the dice. Of course, the shooter can place other bets in addition to the required “line” bet. Most shooters (and players) tend to play the “pass” line. Note that shooters who make “don’t pass” bets are not betting against themselves, they are simply betting that the dice will not “pass”.

Single 0dds: An odd bet that is about as large as the original pass/come bet. Some casinos allow “double odds”, or even larger odds bets.

Snake Eyes: Betting on the number 2.

Vigs: House commissions taken on a particular bet (like the IRS).

Working Bets: That are “live” (i.e., can be resolved with the next roll) are said to be working. Generally, place bets, buy/lay bets, and come odds bets do not work on the come-out unless you tell the dealers to “make them work.” All other bets (e.g., Hardway) work unless you call them “off” (i.e., tell the dealers you do not want them to “work”).

World Bet: A bet that the next roll will be 2, 3, 7, 11, or 12, made in multiples of 5, with one unit on each of the numbers.

Wrong Bettor: A player who bets that the dice will not pass.

Craps Betting

 

Betting The Pass Line
When the “shooter” rolls a 7 or 11 on the first throw (The “Come-out” roll) it is refer to as a “natural” and an automatic win. On the other hand, if 2, 3 or 12 rolls, it is called, “craps” and you lose your “Pass Line” bet. Any other number (4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10) becomes your “Point.” You win if the “Point” repeats before 7 rolls, and you lose if 7 show before your “Point.” Is made. Place these bets in the area marked “Pass Line” on the layout.

When it is your turn to throw the craps dice, you must determine whether to bet the pass line or the don’t pass line. Most shooters, as well as most of the other craps players at the table, will bet the pass line, as it is the basic wager of craps.&C

The pass line wager is an even money bet that wins if you either roll a total of 7 or 11 on the come-out roll, or if you throw a 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 or 10 on the come-out roll and repeat that number before you roll a 7. The pass line bet loses if the come-out roll is a 2, 3, or 12 (known as “craps”) or when a 7 is rolled before the established point number is repeated.

If you successfully complete a pass, – that is, if you repeat an established point number before throwing a 7-, you get to roll the dice again. Only when you seven-out will the stickman push the dice to the next player in succession.

Once you have established a point, if you roll a number other than your point or a 7, it is disregard as far as pass line bets are concerned, although these additional rolls do affect other bets that can be made at the craps table.

As an example, suppose you have established a point of 8 on the come-out roll. If you next throw a 3, then a 5, a 9, and a 10, these numbers will be ignored for pass line bets. But if you then roll 7, you will lose your pass line wager, since the 7 came up before your point number.

Out of 990 decisions at the craps table you can expect to lose 14 decisions more than you win. That makes the house advantage at craps 1.41%. In other words, out of every $100 that you wager at the craps table, you can expect to lose $1.41. Of course this is in the long run. You can win because in the relatively short time you will be playing, there will be fluctuations in this house edge, so at times things will be going in your favor at the craps table.

A pass line bet can be made at any time during a shooter’s roll, even after he has established a point. However, a bet placed on the pass line after a point has been established is a very poor wager, since you have missed the opportunity to win on the come-out roll when the shooter throws a 7 or an 11. The only way you can now win is if the shooter repeats his point before he sevens-out.

Betting The Don’t Pass Line
This is the reverse of betting the “Pass Line.” You lose on a “natural” 7 or 11, and win if a 2 or 3 rolls (12 is a “standoff,” no one wins). If the dice roll 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10 it becomes your “Point” and you win if 7 rolls before your “Point” is repeated. You lose if your “Point” is made before 7 rolls. Place these bets in the area marked “Don’t Pass Line” on the layout.

As you’ve seen, a pass line bet is simply a wager that the shooter will win. But you also can bet that the shooter will fail to make a pass and thus lose.

The don’t pass line bet wins when he shooter throws a craps of 2 or 3, but not 12, on the come-out roll, or when he rolls a 7 before repeating his established point number. This wager loses when the come-out roll is a 7 or 11, or when the shooter repeats his point number before rolling a 7.

The don’t pass line bet is the exact opposite of a pass line with on exception: Although a roll of 12 on the come out loses for pass line betters, it is not a winning number for don’t pass bettors. It is a stand-off and nether wins nor loses. The reason for this is simple: If don’t betters were permitted to win in this situation, they would have an advantage over the house. So by barring (disallowing) the number 12 on the come-out roll, the casinos retain a small edge. Some casinos bar the number 2, but the effect is exactly the same.

Unlike a pass line wager, a don’t pass bet can be removed after a point number has been established on the come-out roll. This is because once a point is established you have an advantage over the house, thus the casino has no objections to your taking down the bet. Of course you should never do this. After going up against an 8 to 3 house edge on the come-out roll, you will have an overall average advantage of 18.8 after a point has been established.

Come Bets
The simplest explanation of “Come” bets is that you’re betting with the dice, exactly as on the “Pass Line,” except that “Come” bets are made any time after the “Come-out” roll. You win on “naturals” 7 or 11, and you lose on “craps” 2, 3 or 12. Any other number becomes your “come-point” and you win if your “come- point” is made before 7 rolls. You make these bets in the area marked “Come” on the layout.

A come bet is identical to a pass line bet, with one exception: A come bet may be made on every throw of the dice once the shooter has established a point. A come bet is made by placing the amount of chips you wish to wager in the designated come area of the craps layout.

After you have placed a come bet, the very next roll of the dice becomes the come-out roll for that wager. Thus if the shooter rolls a 7, you will win even though pass line betters will lose. If an 11 is rolled, you will win while the line bets will not be affected. Conversely, should one of the craps numbers come up you will lose, but the line bets will be unaffected.

Should the shooter throw one of the box numbers on the first roll of the dice after you’ve made a wager on the come, this number becomes an established point for your come bet. To win this bet, your come point must be repeated before a 7 is rolled.

Once a point has been established for your come bet, the dealer will move the chips you have wagered, to the corresponding numbered box on the craps layout to await a decision for that point. When you win a come bet, the dealer will pay you off by placing your original wager, along with your winnings, in the come section of the layout. If you do not immediately retrieve your chips, they will be in action on the next roll of the dice as a new come bet.

To make an odds wager on a come point, hand the dealer the appropriate amount of chips and tell him that you wish to take the odds on that point.

Don’t Come Bets
The reverse of betting the “Come.” You lose on a 7 or 11, and win on a 2 or 3 (12 is a “stand-off”). Here you win if 7 rolls before your “come-point” is repeated, and lose if the “come-point” is made before a 7 is rolled. Place these bets in the area marked “Don’t Come” on the layout.

Don’t come bets can be placed on every throw of the dice after a point has been established. After you have placed a don’t come bet, the very next throw of the dice becomes the come-out roll for that wager. Thus if the shooter rolls a craps number of 2 or 3, you will win while don’t pass line betters will not be affected. If a 7 is rolled, you will lose and wagers on the don’t pass will win. You also will lose if an 11 is thrown, although this number will not have a bearing on don’t pass wagers. A roll of 12 is a stand-off.Proposition Bets
These are all one-roll bets that are decided on each roll of the dice.

Pay Offs
Odds
Any Seven
4 to 1
Any Craps (2,3 and 12)
7 to 1
Eleven (YO)
15 to 1
Hi-Lo (2 and 12)
30 to 1
Horn Bet (2, 3,11 and 12)
7 to 1 (2 or 12) 3 to 1 (3 or 11)

Hardways
There are four Hardway bets: 4, 6, 8 and 10. Hardway bets pays as follows:

Hard 4 & 10: 7 to 1 per dollar bet.
Hard 6 & 8: 9 to 1 per dollar bet.

To win on a Hardway bet, the dice must show a pair before the number 7 is rolled or any other combination of the Hardway number is rolled. For example, if you have a hard 6, the number must be rolled as 3 & 3, before any combination of a 6 (4/2; 5/1; 2/4; 1/5) is rolled

These bets all carry a hefty house edge and are not recommended.

Place Bets
You may make a “Place Bet” any time on any or all of the following numbers: 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10. If the number you have “placed” rolls before a 7 you win and are paid as follows:

Point: 4 or 10: $9.00 for each five dollars wagered.
Place bets on 4 and 10 carry a house advantage of 6.6%.

Point: 5 or 9: $7.00 for each five dollars wagered.
Place bets on the 5 and 9 carry a house advantage of 4%.

Point: 6 or 8: $7.00 for each six dollars wagered.
Place bets on the 6 and 8 are paid off at 7-to-6 on correct odds of 6-to-5, which gives the casino an advantage of 1.51% on these wagers. To insure that you receive the full 7-to-6 payoff on the 6 and 8, you must make your bet in multiples of six, such as $6, $12, $18, and so forth.

Big 6 and Big 8 bets are the same as placing the 6 and 8, except that these bets pay even money, thus giving the house an edge of 9.1%.

You cannot take the odds on place bets. To make a place bet on the 6 or 8, hand your chips to the dealer and ask him to “place the six” or “place the 8.

Buy And Lay Bets
Buy bets are usually made on the 4 and 10. Lay bets are usually made on the 4, 5, 9 or 10. A buy bet wins if the number rolls before a 7. A Lay bet wins when 7 roll before the number. Five percent (5%) is charged for these types of bets.

Field Bets
This is a one-roll bet that may be made on any roll. If 3, 4, 9, 10, or 11 rolls, you win even money. If 2 or 12 is rolled you will win at a ratio of 2 to 1 (some casinos will pay 3 to1 on the number 12).If any other number rolls you lose. This bet is placed in the area marked “Field” on the layout.

As a reminder, any bet where the casino has an advantage is a bet that theoretically will cost you money. Even so, if you make only those wagers that carry a small house edge, your chances of leaving the craps table a winner after a short playing session are reasonably good. I recommend that you make only the following bets, which are the six best wagers in the game of craps:   
Pass line bets with full odds 
Come bets with full odds 
Don’t pass bets with full odds 
Place bets on 6 
Place bets on 8 
Don’t come bets with full odds 

 

Craps Strategies

 

Is it possible to have a betting edge over the casino? No. Are there secrets to winning consistently? Yes!

You may have heard of claims from individuals that they have the “magical system” that is guaranteed to win. Do not believe it. Although there are better systems than others, it is mathematical impossible to create a system that would give a player an edge in any game of chance.

Okay, tell me how to win consistently playing craps! I am going to share with you the secrets of winning consistently. Winning consistently is easy to understand once you know why people loose consistently. Casinos strive basically on four types of players:

1 Players with unrealistic winning goals (greedy).

2 Players who rely strictly on luck (as oppose to skill).

3 Players with little (or no) discipline.

4 Players who play not to lose (as oppose to playing to win).

Assuming this is the case (bet on it), it stands to reason that the key to winning consistently is by Playing Smart.

Playing smart starts with making good bets. Look at the topic on “Calculating Odds” to determine the odds the House has over each bet. Obvious making the best bets and staying away from the bad bets will increase your chances of winning. However, there must be more to winning than making good bets or more people would be winning, right? The other parts to the puzzle of winning consistently are:

1 Having a solid game plan

2 Effective money management

3 Having the discipline and confidence to execute your plans

The next time you visit a casino, try this exercise:
Exercise:
Watching the Table
2 Minimum Bank Roll: $100.00.
3 Maximum bet is: $15.00

TIPS: Get your chips in order. I like to separate my $5 chips in-group of 5 separated by $1 chips. Use what ever makes you feel comfortable. The point here is to always be able to KNOW how much money you are ahead or behind. Avoid making a bet while a roll is in progress. It is hard to get a feel of the game without first observing the action.

GETTING COMFORTABLE
Place one unit ($5) on the Pass Line

Place odds on the shooter point as follows:
If the shooter point is 4 or 10 place single odd. In this case you would put an additional $5 behind your Pass Line.

If the shooter point is 5 or 9 you will place $6.00 behind the Pass Line.

If the shooter point is 6 or 8 you will place double odds or $10.00 behind your Pass Line bet. In either case, your maximum risk is only $15.00. You will repeat this process twice before implementing your system(s).

The purpose here is for you to get a feel of how things are moving on the table. This will help you decide which strategy you would like to execute.

Here are three popular and easy to remember strategies:

STRATEGY #1: Classic Regression. 

Goal: To make a profit on one hit.

In this strategy, you wait until the shooter has made his/her point before placing your bets. After the Point is made you will place two units or $12.00 on both the 6 and 8. After one hit, you will ask the Dealer to come down one unit on both the 6 & 8.

Results: You now have a $2.00 profit and can no longer get hurt by the Seven. In addition, you now have $12.00 working for you. After another hit, bring down all bets and wait for the roller to make his/her point or 7 out, then start the process over.

On two hits your net profit is: $21.00. Now depending on how confident you are, you can come down after the first hit profiting $14.00 or keep betting on the 6 & 8. If you prefer to keep your bets riding make sure that both the 6 & 8 are covered.
Behind the Strategy: There are ten combined ways to make a 6 and 8 and six combined ways for a seven.

STRATEGY #2: ” Three Point Molly”

Goal: To have three numbers working for you at all times.

In this strategy you will make a Pass Line bet and two Come bets.

Make a Pass Line bet.

Backup your Pass Line bet with single or double odds.

Make a Come Line bet.

Backup each Come Bets with single or double odds (two Come bets maximum).

When one of your Come Bets wins, place another Come Bets.

Continue this process until the shooter makes his/her Point or Seven-Out.

Behind the Theory: Each times you make a Come Bet you are protecting your Pass Line bets and taking advantage of a hot roller.

STRATEGY #3: “Anything But Seven”

Goal: To win on any number thrown except a Seven.

Don’t place any bets on the Don’t Pass or Pass Line, but wait until a point has been established.

Place two units on 5, 6, & 8.

Place one unit on the Field.

Results: This method is a little riskier than the previous strategies, since your total monetary risk is: $39.00. Therefore, it is suggested that you remove all bets after three rolls. Should the shooter hold the dice for at least three rolls, you will stand to win anything from $15.00-$27.00(more if the numbers 2 or 12 are rolled).

Behind The Strategy: The average roller rolls the dice 4 to 6 times before rolling a 7.

Gambling Tips

Never play when tried.

2 Never drink and play.

;3 Leave any table after four consecutive losses.

4 Never leave a hot table.

5 Watch how your money is placed by dealers, they do make mistakes.

6 Think about your next move before the dice have been rolled.

7 Bring the proper bankroll for your strategies. Play only at tables you can afford. You should be able to cover at least twenty- five to thirty bets, so don’t sit at a $5 table with less than $125. This is your only protection against inevitable cold streaks.

8 Never let your winnings “ride.” If you win the first then lose, you have nothing but a loss to show for having played even against the VIG, which is ridiculous.

Master two systems, one for the Don’t Pass and one for the Pass Line

10 Don’t try to impress people by betting more than you can afford.

11 Quit when you are ahead: Predetermine a goal for winnings, pocket a sizable fraction once achieved, then play with the remainder, more or less aggressively, depending on your nature and intuition. Don’t be afraid to bet, because the fellow who isn’t afraid to bet is the man who makes the most money. If you gamble every night, you will lose your luck. Remember that luck only lasts a few minutes and then is gone for a long time. If you want to find out if you are lucky, go to a craps game. Gamblers are the backbone of America. I figure you have the same chance of winning the lottery whether you play it or not.

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